ELEVEN RINGS THE SOUL OF SUCCESS EBOOK FREE DOWNLOAD

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Editorial Reviews. From Booklist. Phil Jackson won an unprecedented 11 championship rings $ Read with Our Free App; Audiobook. $ Free with your Audible trial . Due to its large file size, this book may take longer to download. Eleven Rings by Phil Jackson and Hugh Delehanty. Read an Excerpt Eleven Rings. The Soul of Success Buy the Audiobook Download: Apple · Audible. Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success to download this book the link is on the Description Eleven Rings A "New York Times "bestseller During his.


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Why not share! An annual anal Embed Size px. Start on. Show related SlideShares at end. WordPress Shortcode. Published in: Full Name Comment goes here. Are you sure you want to Yes No. Be the first to like this. No Downloads. Views Total views. Actions Shares. At times, I found Jackson to come across as condescending toward other teams, players and coaches that may not have achieved the same level of success as he has achieved.

Not enough to be blatant or libelous but it does appear nonetheless. Do I recommend?

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Yes, especially for basketball fans. However, I think that fans of other sports and even some readers who may not be sports fans, but want to see how successful leaders build teams would like this book. Feb 01, Tim Larison rated it it was amazing Shelves: The Soul of Success was just the right book for me to read. Two of my passions are learning about spirituality and following professional sports.

He tells stories of the star players he mentors, such as the Lakers Kobe Bryant. Soon he was making an effort to connect more closely with his teammates and figure out how to forge them into a more cohesive team. His mother and father were Pentecostal Christian ministers, a path Jackson almost followed himself. He was initially reluctant to play for the Knicks as he wanted to go to graduate school to become a pastor. Eventually, I arrived at a synthesis that felt authentic to me.

The book is equally valuable in profiling the coach as a highly successful professional living his spirituality in everyday life. Mar 28, Fryeday rated it really liked it. I was very curious to read something about Phil because his nickname is Zen Master and that's something I desire to be whether in actuality or just perception of peers remains to be seen.

I highlighted a lot in this book and I also saved numerous book titles to my "to-read" list. So in that way, the book was completely worth it for me. I must say I kept thinking to myself "there's probably so much more he's not telling us. I definitely love the descriptions of how he meshes meditation, mindfulness practices, etc.

I have personally noticed a huge difference in Kobe Bryant from when he came into the league and now and I definitely felt it was more than just getting older and Phil's book confirms that.

The book makes me want to know way more about him though. I'm interested to see how his children are, what his relationships with ex-wives are like. I'm nosy. I like that this book to me had just as much Buddhist philosophy as it did basketball. It was a sheer treat! In a way, this book served its purpose because it helped demystifying the relationship between Phil Jackson's spiritual mumbo jumbo and his incredible success as an NBA coach to me.

Of course it doesn't make sense to fans and bystanders, because we've never had anything at stake together.

Truth is, when you perform at that level, against such an insane level of opposition, you look for every possible edge you can gain on the opposition, by thinking differently and forming a collective consciousn In a way, this book served its purpose because it helped demystifying the relationship between Phil Jackson's spiritual mumbo jumbo and his incredible success as an NBA coach to me.

Truth is, when you perform at that level, against such an insane level of opposition, you look for every possible edge you can gain on the opposition, by thinking differently and forming a collective consciousness. Granted he has exceptional lineups especially during the Bulls' runs , Phil did that 11 times in 19 years. I thought it also was a testimony on the ephemeral nature of things. As good as Jackson's teams were, as dominant his legacies have been, he does a great job at illustrating how difficult success is to bear and how change is an integral part of legacies, although it doesn't assure it.

I don't think this is meant as a guide to young coaches or anything, but it's a statement that you have to find your own way to achieve the highest levels of success in life. Mar 03, Tony Zale rated it really liked it. The experience of watching the 90s Chicago Bulls defined my understanding of sport.

Year after year, we religiously watched the NBA playoffs. The poise of Michael Jordan and his supporting cast made victory feel inevitable. After each, we made a pilgrimage to a makeshift championship t-shirt stand in the ballroom of Skokie's Holiday Inn, returning with the latest"big head" or "ring" shirt design. Phil Jackson's reputation as "the zen master" solidified during this period, but my understanding of The experience of watching the 90s Chicago Bulls defined my understanding of sport.

Phil Jackson's reputation as "the zen master" solidified during this period, but my understanding of his philosophies were sketchy at best. At most, I recognized the absence of Ditka-like rants in press conferences and on the sidelines. Eleven Rings shows that was no mistake.

Jackson asks players to focus on a few core ideas: He finds parallels between mindfulness and basketball that are both beautiful and ridiculous. How often were the connections only realized in retrospect? I found myself not caring because his amusing anecdotes of interpersonal dynamics ring true. And it doesn't hurt that he clearly favors the Bulls over s Lakers. If you've been a basketball fan for the last 20 years, there isn't a lot of new material in this book from that perspective.

The stories of the evolution of the Bulls and Michael Jordan from one man band to dynasty, the squabbles of the Shaq-Kobe Lakers and then the renewal of the Kobe-Pau Lakers have been well documented. However, what's most interesting about the book is gaining an insight into Phil Jackson's skills as a manager.

This is a book more about teamwork, management, leadership and m If you've been a basketball fan for the last 20 years, there isn't a lot of new material in this book from that perspective. This is a book more about teamwork, management, leadership and massaging egos than basketball Xs and Os. Even if you don't care about basketball, there is enough wisdom in those lessons to make this a worthwhile and quick read for anyone.

Apr 16, Nick rated it liked it. Phil Jackson coached some of the NBA's greatest players Jordan and Kobe and some of its most mercurial Rodman but had unparalleled success by helping his teams find themselves. It's not clear how Jackson found his own spiritual calling, drawing from eastern philosophy and religion as well as Native American culture, but he channeled it to manage big egos.

You've got to be interested in detailed accounts of basketball games to love this book, but anyone interested in leadership can learn some Phil Jackson coached some of the NBA's greatest players Jordan and Kobe and some of its most mercurial Rodman but had unparalleled success by helping his teams find themselves. You've got to be interested in detailed accounts of basketball games to love this book, but anyone interested in leadership can learn something from it.

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Nov 10, Justin Tapp rated it it was ok Shelves: There was much less about practical coaching and management wisdom than I hoped for in this book. It's not evident that Jackson is reading and learning from other management and leadership works himself, or other coaches other than those who have already been with him for years.

He quotes a few Buddhist works or proverbs but that's about it, so I found him to be pretty intellectually shallow despite being famous for giving his players books. Rather late in his career, after a few seasons with Kobe Bryant, Jackson writes he contacted a psychologist for advice.

The advice seemed superficial at best "focus on positive reinforcement" and Jackson didn't use it long. This kind of helter skelter application of shallow psychology doesn't strike me as very well-educated or thoughtful. Jackson learned a lot of his coaching from Red Holzman while playing for the Knicks.

One lesson from Holzman was when asked the difference between winning and losing: Chop wood, carry water. Jackson revels in breaking Holzman rival Red Auerbach's championship record. There are a few points Jackson makes up front about how he tried to instill teamwork into the Bulls and Lakers.

One that stood out was: For example, Jackson has his teams stand in a circle before and after practice, everything in a circle.

Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success

He calls the team area the "tribal room," etc. Sometimes he even led tense Laker teams in silent moments to synchronize their breath. He is famous for giving his players books on road trips, and he recounts which books he gave which players. This practice has earned Jackson the reputation as being somehow book smart, whereas as I point out elsewhere that doesn't really seem to be the case.

Generally, there doesn't appear much that sets apart Jackson from other coaches other than the rings. Having read books by other championship coaches I was interested to see if there were any lessons or daily principles they follow. The only constant with Jackson appears to be meditation for stress relief and emotional regulation.

But the meditation doesn't help his anger issues and he deals with years of repressed anger after his daughter is assaulted and Kobe Bryant is arrested on similar charges. His parents were Pentecostals who erroneously taught him that "anger was wrong" Jesus got angry plenty, after all , and this had harmful consequences for him. Given some of his other behavior, I find his method of zen meditation rather unappealing and incomplete.

He's had broken marriage, a range of ups and downs with his players and management, and I don't see any particular reason for his success other than acquiring big-market talent. Sometimes that talent agreed to work together and with him, at other times it didn't. He had issues with management at every stop. One omission that stands out is any praise for other coaches like Gregg Popovich of the Spurs who consistently beat the Lakers with the non-flashy, team basketball that Jackson apparently espouses.

But Popovich and co. The only coaches Jackson praises are those on teams that he beats, like the staff of Larry Bird's Pacers. He clearly dislikes Pat Riley. He doesn't praise any of the teams that beat the ego-driven Lakers, or admit the contradiction of humbler teams dismantling his own. Last year I listened to Ronald Lazenby's biography of Michael Jordan, so I had a vivid picture in my mind of Jackson's years with the Bulls and was eager to hear his own take.

Jackson's version of those years is pretty scrubbed or wasn't much I hadn't heard before. Jackson inherited a Bulls team that was peaking under the greatest and most competitive player who ever lived.

He doesn't have much negative to say about anyone in Chicago other than Jerry Krauss. In Lazenby's book, he claims from one of Phil's other books? The book infuriated Jordan and Jackson apparently had done so to motivate him.

An assistant coach took the heat and got fired. Jackson simply writes in Eleven Rings that he tried to save the assistant coach. Contra Lazenby's account, Jordan isn't found on the back of the team bus drinking beer with Ron Harper while relentlessly haranguing Krauss after games. In Eleven Rings, it's Scottie Pippen who once gets drunk and tells off management. Jordan comes across as somewhat selfish, but is contrasted later as much more selfless than Kobe Bryant, who Jackson had a real feud with.

Jackson recounts a funny story of a team manager assigned to watch Rodman during a road trip and the cross-country adventure he took him on. In the end, the Bulls players hated their management and the management couldn't afford to pay them all. Jackson seems to have a difficult time communicating with his players, and on at least one occasion in the book an assistant pulls him aside to correct him. Jackson provides no insights on how he chose his assistants other than Tex Winter , mentors them, delegates tasks, etc.

They just exist in the background. Jackson plays the media against his players sometimes, leaking things or making side remarks to the media that enrage his players; Kobe made it a condition of playing for him in his last stint with the Lakers that he "be more discreet with the media.

Jackson's attempt to "bring the Buddha" to the Lakers for a championship is somewhat amusing but definitely not a magical experience. Kobe Bryant is vilified as an immature, selfish jerk. Then, later noted for being a good teammate and talking like someone who meditates and has found his inner self. Kobe admits that Phil is right and that he grew as a person.

Then, we go back to Kobe the selfish jerk who yells at teammates to "give me the damn ball" and causes the team to self-destruct. Jackson makes no secret of favoring Shaq, creating a rift between himself and Jerry Buss and Kobe Bryant by demanding they trade Kobe. This despite the fact that Shaq shows up overweight and out of shape every fall and takes half the season to get back to form every year, something Kobe couldn't stand.

After one year of working together, Shaq and Bryant decide they can't coexist. Jackson introduces Shaq to Sidartha to warn him away from materialism; an unrepentant Shaq writes a book report. Maybe as the last dig at Kobe, Jackson writes a paragraph comparing him with Michael Jordan. Jordan was stronger, making him a better defender and rebounder.

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He was a less-selfish teammate and found other ways to help his team when his shot wasn't falling. He famously doesn't pass the ball if he wants his shot and doesn't play defense with any great intensity.

Rick Fox apparently wrote that Kobe competes with himself and didn't behave the same way off the court as on, while MJ was competitive in everything non-stop.

I give this book 2 stars out of 5. If you're an avid Lakers and Bulls fan you might want this book, but you've probably already read what's in it. There are no great insights into managing a coaching staff or finding a way to maximize the strengths of your team to win if you don't have Hall of Fame talent on it.

Oct 17, Bruce rated it really liked it Shelves: For those of you who don't follow basketball are there any of you out there?

As it's NBA tradition for owners to gift commemorative rings to the members of their championship teams, Eleven For those of you who don't follow basketball are there any of you out there? His memoir neatly integrates a play-the-hits sports autobiography with management philosophy. Jackson provides only the skeleton of his personal life: Then again, his only purpose in doing so is to follow his influences and philosophical evolution.

For example, we learn that he used sports to escape from the strictures of church-life but ended up devoted to basketball because of what he saw as its collective beauty, that a small group of close-knit people working together in harmony could overcome nearly any set of more talented individuals. In basketball, as in life, Jackson finds cultivating an all-for-one selfless mentality to be the key to maximizing performance.

It's no mean trick. A lifelong learner, Jackson mentions various sources ranging from religious teachings Christianity, Sufism, Buddhism to coursework in psychology to the occasional seminar from Steven Covey, et al. Early on, he references Sebastian Junger 's observations about War. Jackson finds much similarity between the collective spirit he tried to instill in his teams and the band-of-brotherhood agape that motivates soldiers in the trenches.

Over the years, the coach has relied heavily on meditation as a means of "stilling" his and his players' minds, minimizing distractions, and rendering all more receptive to mindful or instinctive or drilled -- each of these distinct things reactions to game situations.

Whether diverting Dennis Rodman or cutting Smush Parker, his appreciation of basic psychology has helped him to get the most out of players with different needs. However, the greatest influence on his coaching philosophy would seem to be Dave Logan's ideas about tribalism, what he calls "The Five Stages of Culture.

Jackson mentions neither psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi 's ideas about flow here nor the rhythmic synchronization of the brain's timing mechanisms that musical ensembles are said to experience, but it seems clear that Coach Jackson's er, Tex Winter's preferred "triangle," or motion, offense works best when players synch up and enter the flow state.

The further along the team's tribal stage, the easier and more frequently the players enter this state, and the greater satisfaction they report deriving from practices and games. I definitely enjoyed reliving the highs and lows of each postseason as retold here, as well as Jackson's analysis of the key differences between Michael Jordan's and Kobe Bryant's respective approaches to the game, both physically and in terms of attitude and coachability.

Suffice it to say that while both were ruthless competitors, in terms of overall maturity we all should strive to be like Mike. With deference to Jackson's acknowledged weakness for veering into ambiguous platitudes, there are times when he is wont to surrender to new age, executive mumbo jumbo.

The quoted passage suggests that Whitelaw has recharacterized flow as "joy" and sought to rebrand the concept in her own neologism. It may feel like energy that keeps renewing itself, much as pumping a swing seemingly gives us more energy than it takes.

Jackson compounds the misattribution by going on to equate this feeling to "sustained enthusiasm," and a "wave of creative energy.

Fortunately, such obnoxious turns are rare. We bought this book for my son, who picked it out. I just got permission to read it ahead of him when he opted first to read a Michael Jordan biography. As it happens, the team my son plays on is now learning the motion offense, and I've had the opportunity to observe some of its workings firsthand. They, like Jackson, refer to it as a "read-and-react" offense, and I was so taken with the deeper insight into the system's intents and strengths that Jackson's book affords that I'm looking forward to seeing how or whether my son incorporates what he learns from his own reading into his game or his interactions with others.

After all, while Jackson's book will certainly be of interest to students of basketball, it has much to offer to everyone. Jul 01, Bookbed rated it liked it Shelves: This book is one of our Recommended Reads! Read our post here. Please note: We don't use ratings but for this purpose, we tag books with three stars by default.

Sign up here! We also accept review requests. More info here. Oct 10, Isaac Thomas rated it it was ok. Not a good autobiography, but incredibly interesting if you're a basketball fan, or interested in leadership philosophy. Learning how he managed the Dennis Rodman's mental nutjob from a rough background and Kobe Bryant's egomaniacs was really insightful.

It was also fun to see him throw some shade at NBA players, coaches, and refs that he still despises 25 years later.

Much of it is incredibly boring. Only read if you're a basketball diehard. Feb 04, John Parks rated it it was amazing. This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I knew this book existed for a long time but I never got around to reading it until now.

For example I found it interesting that he gave his players books to read to not only improve them as players but as people as well. He also made his players do meditation which is pretty interesting as well.

Mar 22, Jason Korn rated it really liked it. Great story about all of Phil Jackson's championship teams and their season s. If you're not a sports fan, there is still a lot of valuable info about leadership and Zen Buddhism. Zen and then some As a basketball fanatic I truly enjoyed this end to end accounting of Phil Jackson's amazing career that produced 11 rings - most when he was acting as a coach.

My only gripe is that I expected more leadership advice - but what is on offer is quite valuable. Apr 25, LeeTravelGoddess rated it it was amazing. A non leadership book that is spot on about leadership and I love it!!! Amazing book! Very good insight on the mind of Phil Jackson and interesting behind the scenes look of the teams he coached.

I picked up this book, which belonged to my ex-husband, shortly after my father passed away. It took me 18 months to finish this. I took a peek at it and was hooked from page one. I also enjoyed the notes and underlined sentences my ex wrote which also resonated with me. My father was an avid basketball fan. Reading this was, in a way, an extension of my father who had this knack of describing past plays in great detail including players' names, scorings, signature moves, team coaching, and more I picked up this book, which belonged to my ex-husband, shortly after my father passed away.

Reading this was, in a way, an extension of my father who had this knack of describing past plays in great detail including players' names, scorings, signature moves, team coaching, and more. In fact, just before he died, he was watching Game 1 of the championship between Cleveland Cavaliers and Golden State Warriors. Cleveland Cavaliers won by the way in case that was important. Many of the takeaways from this book were also applicable to my work as an organizational ombuds.

In short, this book served as 1 a daily conversation with my late father, 2 thought of the day for work, and 3 fun way to learn more about basketball and the well-known star players! It's basically about Phil Jackson, the legendary head coach for Chicago Bulls and LA Lakers, and his coaching style which stemmed from various spiritual practices including details of Lakota spiritual philosophy along with tenets of Zen Buddhism.

He was dedicated to the concept of elevating his players from individual competitive beings to a team of talent and skill that did magic. The whole "Zen master" thing was what set him apart from other basketball coaches and led him to win 11 championships. That's a remarkable feat itself.

Eleven Rings by Phil Jackson, Hugh Delehanty | swiss-city.info: Books

Almost god-like even. Lead from the inside out focus on your team, don't worry too much about what the other teams were doing 2. Bench the ego everyone played a leadership role from a rookie to a star player 3. Let each player discover his own destiny relate to each player as a whole person 4. The road to freedom is a beautiful system a well defined game structure to allow room for limitless creativity 5. Turn the mundane into the sacred incorporated meditation into practices 6.

The key to success is compassion Lao-Tau's leadership principle using simplicity, patience and compassion.

Basically using kind, thoughtful words can have transformative effect on relationships even with the toughest men on team 8. Keep your eye on the spirit, not on the scoreboard Surrender his self-interest for the greater good--the whole team adds up to more than the sum of its parts, ignoring tactics 9.

Sometimes you have to pull out the big stick Zen practice of waking the players up and raising their consciousness through practices such as playing in silence or in the dark to help players become more intuitive When in doubt, do nothing Allowing mind to relax to generate solutions Forget the ring Obsessing about winning is a loser's game.

Enjoying the ride and focusing on elevating the team to be great together Phil was adamant that success wasn't a one-person effort. One of his favorite poems, "Outwitted" by Edwin Markham summed this up beautifully: He drew a circle that shut me out — Heretic, rebel, a thing to flout. But Love and I had the wit to win: We drew a circle that took him in!

I often give away paper books after I'm done reading but this one I will keep to re-read over time. Many wonderful leadership and management tidbits that focus more on the collective spirit of "we" that'd transform the world. Sep 18, Brennan rated it it was amazing. Brennan Kulick English 3 Due: September 17, Ms. Weilnau Eleven Rings: The Soul of Success Part 1: The main character of this book is Phil Jackson.

It starts out with Phil talking about his childhood and where he lived and about his parents. He talks about his Christian parents and how he came about to love the game of basketball in high school.

Phil was a pretty average player in the NBA and he fit in pretty well. Phil Jackson won two championships with the Knicks in , and After that Phil took a short break from basketball and realized he had missed the game and had still wanted to be involved with it.